Date Tags links

My suggestion would be not to shoot press releases in all directions for the sole purpose of building links. Be very genuine of the purpose of writing your press release. There are few things more frustrating and downright annoying than investing a large amount of money into a well-researched, written and designed piece of content — that nobody sees. Competitor analysis is a lot easier when you have the right tools. While Panda’s been around for a quite a few years now, it got a significant update at the end of September that helps it sniff out low-quality (i.e., “thin”) content.

So, how’s this affect you? What kind of word-count should you shoot for with your web pages and blog posts? Is Google going to downgrade your valuable content? Don’t panic: as long as you’re not doing anything sketchy, you should be fine.

Bigger is Better, But No Magic Number

There’s plenty of interesting search engine optimization (SEO) research out there that shows that long copy can perform, convert, and rank better than shorter content. Longer content gives Google more concepts to index, earns more links, and can become the definitive resource on a niche topic.

Think about link bait from the start

Another factor is the ever-increasing quantity of content that goes online every day. People love to browse through Get your sums right - the primary resources are all available. Its as easy as KS2 Maths or like your ABC. Its that easy! a clearance section for bargains. You could include overstocked items or products nearing the end of their buying season. A dollar section for low priced merchandise can generate a lot of sales, especially if your website offers pop up suggestions for related items from your store. The customers will feel like they are getting a great deal and you will get more sales. As a business owner, you want your site to show up in results when it’s highly relevant to the user. If each blog post, article or press release is a brush stroke, then the overarching content marketing strategy is the masterpiece hanging in the Louvre; it can take a long time to get there, but it is definitely worth it.

Brands who have implemented SEO strategies successfully boast greater brand awareness

This sounds condescendingly obvious, but Google really dislikes what it calls ‘thin content’. Essentially, these are pages that offer little in way of value to your audience – and will usually come in the form of extremely short webpages comprising only a few sentences. Google is “learning” what a good result looks like based on the search query. Google doesn ’t want a website owner to be able to artificially climb its SERPs. Rather, Google wants websites to climb the ranks only when they are genuinely valuable and popular with the audience. It wants to see natural, organic links that you haven’t paid for and it wants to see deep, relevant and interesting content. Businesses are becoming increasingly savvy about paid search. It’s a measurable advertising mechanism by which you can track exactly how much you’re spending and what the return is. However, many businesses have not yet invested in organic search because they aren’t sure how it works or how to measure it.

Lets look at our approach to trust rank

The more people that search engines see being interested in your content, the more weight they’ll give it and the higher it will rank. Voice searching, unlike traditional search terms, address the “who, what, where, why and how” questions that we are more likely to use in natural conversations. You only need to look at the recent article by eConsultancy to see that potential customers aren’t looking for products just for the sake of it. Gaz Hall, from SEO Hull, had the following to say: "Google has really focused its algorithm on providing relevant content in search. They want to improve the user experience y providing the most relevant search results for the query or question being asked. This means that while you can have great backlinks, you still need to also have great content."

Write about static pages

A general rule to follow when creating your new URLs: use dashes (-) between words instead of underscores (_). Google treats dashes as separators, which means it can return results when you search for a single word that appears in a URL and when you search for a group of words that appears in a URL. In contrast, Google treats underscores as connectors, which means it will only return results when you search for a group of connected words that appears in a URL. The bottom line: using dashes creates more opportunities for your pages to be discovered. If I'm always shocked by Beverley Guide, in this regard. you have a multiple site strategy selling the same products – you are probably going to cannibalise your traffic in the long run, rather than dominate a niche, as you used to be able to do. The best domain name lookup tools go beyond your immediate enquiry and search for known popular keyphrase variants of your chosen phrase. What is Thin Content and Why is it Bad for SEO? By Adam Snape on 20th February 2015 Categories: Content, Google, SEO

In February 2011, Google rolled out an update to its search algorithm called Panda – the first in a series of algorithm updates aimed at penalising low quality websites in search and improving the quality of their search results.

Although Panda was first rolled out several years ago (and followed by Penguin, an update aimed at knocking out black-hat SEO techniques) it’s been updated several times since its initial launch, most recently in September of 2014.

The latest Panda update has much the same purpose as the original – giving better rankings to websites that have useful and relevant content, and penalising sites that have “thin” content that offers little or no value to searchers.

In this guide, we’ll look at what makes content “thin” and why having thin content on your site is a bad thing. We’ll also share some simple tactics that you can use to give your content more value to searchers and avoid having to deal with a penalty.

What is thin content? Thin content can be identified as low quality pages that add little to no value to the reader. Examples of thin content include duplicate pages, automatically generated content or doorway pages.

The best way to measure the quality of your content is through user satisfaction. If visitors quickly bounce from your page, it likely doesn’t provide the value they were looking for.

Google’s initial Panda update was targeted primarily at content farms – sites with a massive amount of content written purely for the purpose of ranking well in search and attracting as much traffic as possible.

You’ve probably clicked your way onto a content farm before – most of us have. The content is typically packed with keywords and light on factual information, giving it big relevancy for a search engine but little value for an actual reader.

The original Panda update also targeted scraper websites – sites that “scraped” text from other websites and reposted it as their own, lifting the work of other people to generate their own search traffic.

As Panda updates keep rolling out, the focus has switched from content farms and scraper sites to websites that offer “thin” content – content that’s full of keywords and copy, but light on any real information.

A great way to think of content is as search engine food. The more unique content your website offers search engines, the more satisfied they are and the higher you will likely rank for the keywords your on-page content mentions.

Offer little food and you’ll provide little for Google to use to understand the focus of your site’s content. As a result, you’ll be outranked for your target search keywords by other websites that offer more detailed, helpful and informative content.

How can Google tell if content is thin? Google’s index includes more than 30 trillion pages, making it impossible to check every page for thin content by hand. While some websites are occasionally subject to a manual review by Google, most content is judged for its value algorithmically.

The ultimate judge of a website’s content is its audience – the readers that visit the site and actually read its content. If the content is good, they’ll probably stay on the website and keep reading; if it’s bad, there’s a good chance they’ll leave.

The length of your content isn’t necessarily an indicator of its “thinness”. As Stephen Kenwright explains at Search Engine Watch, a 2,000 word article on EzineArticles is likely to offer less value to readers than a 500 word blog post by a real expert.

One way Google can algorithmically judge the value of a website’s content is using a metric called “time to long click”. A long click is when a user clicks on a search result and stays on the website for a long time before returning to Google’s search page.

Think about how you browse a website when you discover great quality content. If a blog post or article is particularly engaging, you don’t just read for a minute or two – you click around the website and view other content as well.

A short click, on the other hand, is when a user clicks on a search result and almost immediately returns to Google’s search results page. From here, they might click on another result, indicating to Google that the first result didn’t provide much value.

Should you be worried about thin content? The best measure of your content’s value is user satisfaction. If users stay on your website for a long time after clicking onto it from Google’s search results pages, it probably has high quality, “thick” content that Google likes.