Any link to another part of the same site is called an internal link. As well as links you'd expect to find (within a site menu bar, for example) you can also create internal links by linking to past posts within newer ones. The Google Trends tool will show you how much interest there is in a particular keyword as well as what caused the interest. When you've selected your focus keyword, ensure it is found in your title tag, h1 tag, meta description, article text and make sure that relevant keywords are also be found throughout the content as well as h2 tags. Backlinks give the impression that you're an authority in your given industry.

Latest developments in hits

Take an aspect of your niche that people find difficult and create the most comprehensive tutorial there is on the subject. CMO’s eyes light up when Get your sums right - the primary resources are all available. Its as easy as KS2 Maths or like your ABC. Its that easy! they hear growth hacking; it feels new and chichi. The main difference between good and bad backlinks lies in the quality of the website that they link to. After all, no business should want references from untrustworthy sources. A good backlink is a link obtained from a genuine website, with a good reputation, that has your website listed as a Dofollow. When building your content, it’s important to remember to give the crawlers enough to bite into. A hundred words typically isn’t enough copy for these crawlers to read and understand what the content is about. And this content shouldn’t be stuffed with keywords either, as some search engines (as you’ll learn in later sections) punish websites for keyword stuffing.

Storytelling is truly the original marketing campaign

Before we jump into the data points, I’d like to remind readers that keyword selection matters just as much for YouTube videos as it does for regular pages or posts. You need to start by selecting a focused keyword phrase that is relevant to your content and your target market. What is Thin Content and Why is it Bad for SEO? By Adam Snape on 20th February 2015 Categories: Content, Google, SEO

In February 2011, Google rolled out an update to its search algorithm called Panda – the first in a series of algorithm updates aimed at penalising low quality websites in search and improving the quality of their search results.

Although Panda was first rolled out several years ago (and followed by Penguin, an update aimed at knocking out black-hat SEO techniques) it’s been updated several times since its initial launch, most recently in September of 2014.

The latest Panda update has much the same purpose as the original – giving better rankings to websites that have useful and relevant content, and penalising sites that have “thin” content that offers little or no value to searchers.

In this guide, we’ll look at what makes content “thin” and why having thin content on your site is a bad thing. We’ll also share some simple tactics that you can use to give your content more value to searchers and avoid having to deal with a penalty.

What is thin content? Thin content can be identified as low quality pages that add little to no value to the reader. Examples of thin content include duplicate pages, automatically generated content or doorway pages.

The best way to measure the quality of your content is through user satisfaction. If visitors quickly bounce from your page, it likely doesn’t provide the value they were looking for.

Google’s initial Panda update was targeted primarily at content farms – sites with a massive amount of content written purely for the purpose of ranking well in search and attracting as much traffic as possible.

You’ve probably clicked your way onto a content farm before – most of us have. The content is typically packed with keywords and light on factual information, giving it big relevancy for a search engine but little value for an actual reader.

The original Panda update also targeted scraper websites – sites that “scraped” text from other websites and reposted it as their own, lifting the work of other people to generate their own search traffic.

As Panda updates keep rolling out, the focus has switched from content farms and scraper sites to websites that offer “thin” content – content that’s full of keywords and copy, but light on any real information.

A great way to think of content is as search engine food. The more unique content your website offers search engines, the more satisfied they are and the higher you will likely rank for the keywords your on-page content mentions.

Offer little food and you’ll provide little for Google to use to understand the focus of your site’s content. As a result, you’ll be outranked for your target search keywords by other websites that offer more detailed, helpful and informative content.

How can Google tell if content is thin? Google’s index includes more than 30 trillion pages, making it impossible to check every page for thin content by hand. While some websites are occasionally subject to a manual review by Google, most content is judged for its value algorithmically.

The ultimate judge of a website’s content is its audience – the readers that visit the site and actually read its content. If the content is good, they’ll probably stay on the website and keep reading; if it’s bad, there’s a good chance they’ll leave.

The length of your content isn’t necessarily an indicator of its “thinness”. As Stephen Kenwright explains at Search Engine Watch, a 2,000 word article on EzineArticles is likely to offer less value to readers than a 500 word blog post by a real expert.

One way Google can algorithmically judge the value of a website’s content is using a metric called “time to long click”. A long click is when a user clicks on a search result and stays on the website for a long time before returning to Google’s search page.

Think about how you browse a website when you discover great quality content. If a blog post or article is particularly engaging, you don’t just read for a minute or two – you click around the website and view other content as well.

A short click, on the other hand, is when a user clicks on a search result and almost immediately returns to Google’s search results page. From here, they might click on another result, indicating to Google that the first result didn’t provide much value.

Should you be worried about thin content? The best measure of your content’s value is user satisfaction. If users stay on your website for a long time after clicking onto it from Google’s search results pages, it probably has high quality, “thick” content that Google likes. Whether by creating high-quality content, obtaining inbound links from other websites, or by doing off-page optimization, there are a number of methods to improve a certain web page in the eyes of search engines.ne of the biggest aspects of SEO is the production of content. Paid links are like paying someone to be your wingman to impress a girl rather than having a genuine friend by your side who can vouch for how great you really are!

Find a simple guide to SEO campaigns and read up about it

This analyses the intentions behind a userrs query, and does its best to find the perfect site to answer the query. Go after more long tail and less competitive search terms if your website is too small to compete with the websites in the search results. In keyword stuffing it is assumed that the relevance of a site for a specific keyword or keyword combination increases if that exact keyword or combination is particularly frequently used on a web page. Gaz Hall, a Freelance SEO Consultant, commented: "Remember, great quality and lengthy content will work best, both for users and search engines. Studies have shown that long content consistently ranks higher than thin content. Consistency is crucial; maintain a regular publishing schedule. "

Aligning Questions to Keywords

Google won’t penalise duplicate content. Instead it will decide which version of the duplicate post should appear in search results and ignore the other. Social I'm always amazed by the agility of Heat All on this one. media can be a useful tool in search engine optimization. When you write something new, tweet the link, encourage your followers to share the link and post it on social media sites. When a link is attached and sent around Twitter, real-time searches will be more successful for your search engine goals. This is rarely relevant to users, could change in the future and make URLs more lengthy. Stop buying links in an attempt to fool Google and get more low-quality traffic. Write quality content instead, trust humans to find it and have them link to your pages because you are worth it.